About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
CNNW 26
CSPAN2 22
CSPAN 21
CNBC 19
MSNBCW 13
FOXNEWS 10
FBC 9
CNN 6
KQEH (PBS) 6
MSNBC 5
SFGTV2 5
COM 4
KGO (ABC) 3
KQED (PBS) 3
KPIX (CBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 185
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 185 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced since the depression. and we believe if somebody can show that they
hill. why do we not see that any more? is it two sides or environment is so hardened? >> i think so. i also think that personality of these two men would not be best described as anti-social they to. but we're seeing this weird culture of bipartisan, you know we were supposed to put it away after the elect, and think about what is best of the country. i think they are staaing separate, they should be eating athe same table now. neil: they are not doing that. there is so much you could dodo with a serogate, and say surprise it seems to me, dr., doctor when ronald reagan heard things come up out of capitol hill, or tip o'neill he brought him over to the white house, said how can we compromise on this his famous line, i would rather get 80% of a loaf or no loaf at all, we don't see it, it is either my way or the highway, and i blame motorcycl both side. >> i do too, you said t word, compromise that is what works in great marriaging and even politics. meet in the middle. neil: why not have it at the white house? i think that white house, if you do something in private residences a big deal
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
appealed to him, and they didn't now. finding neither subjects nor an artistic environment that suited him, he left london and traveled 275 miles to the north. he settled in the small fishing village of cullercoats on the north sea and rented a studio two houses from the rescue station, overlooking the beach. here was his first encounter with the wild and elemental forces of nature. the rhythm of life in cullercoats was determined by the fishing boats, which set out at dusk and returned in the morning. gradually, homer began to replace descriptive detail with the concentrated drama of individuals bent on the task of survival in a rugged environment. although he had intended to stay in cullercoats only for the summer, he remained almost two years. in october, he watched the life brigade rescue the crew of a wrecked ship-- the iron crown. he sketched the scene from the beach and later painted one of his largest and most ambitious watercolors. at cullercoats, homer's works took on a new monumentality. in the lives of the fisherwomen, he perceived both the gravity of the human condition and th
and in the environment grow more numerous and more fearsome. in response, progressives of all stripes coalesce, find their voice and their strength and pioneer the development of a powerful set of new ideas and policy proposals confirming that the path to a better world does, indeed, exist. demonstrations and protests multiply, and a popular movement for pro-democracy reform and transformative change is born. at the local level, people in groups plant the seeds of change through a host of innovative initiatives that provide inspirational models of how things might work in a new political economy devoted to sustaining human and natural communities. and sensing the direction in which things are moving, our wiser and more responsible leaders rise to the occasion, support the growing movement for change and frame a compelling story or narrative that makes sense of it all and provides a positive vision of a better america. the movement broadens to become a major national force. we don't know exactly how these or other forces will emerge or interact, but we do know this: that pleas for immediate action, f
homes. >> stephen: yes, a grahnee pod. why spend time in a cold, sterile hospital environment far from your family when you could be in a cold, sterile hostile environment within sight of your family. in your very own medical grade shed. for just $85 to $125,000, grahnee pods offer a cozy 12 by 24 feet, almost one/8th of a volleyball court. sure it's small but think how often your granddaughter will visit once she sees you living in a doll house. and you won't need a live-in nurse because the grahnee pod is packed with the one thing helder-- elderly people love most, technology. >> we put an automatic dispenser that in turn the caregiver can pull up on their ipad and they can see whether or not they've taken their medication. >> now your family can check your meds from their ipad. it is medical care with all the bedside manner of an automatic cat feeder. (laughter) now i'm aware, i'm aware, folks, not everybody has the backyard space for a grahnee pod. that is why tonight i'm proud to introduce my new product for budget conscious golden age living stephen colbert's peepaw crate. it's a
? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government battles too much in the economy, its policies are driven by politics and markets are driven by individuals and the real world music people. that's the difference between what government does about markets do. you need government to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers the government can protect us from them. overly meddlesome government goes to fire and you end up suppressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout. are you supportive of that government intervention? >> release the question and answer of the book basically. you can see that as an emergency intervention. this government had done it back now, that would've been fine. unfortunately they stayed too long. the comparison they make is to katrina. there's emergency aid and basically people get up and back on their feet. but unfortunately the government conceded the financial crisis as a
something we can do about. it's how the thing we're doing to the environment are making these things more unbearable. for example, construction, you know, soon after the earthquake in haiti thereu was an earthqua in chile that killed on slightly same level or killed less than 100 people.at and ours ended up killing so many people. we are a city of badly constructed buildings and all of the things. people had been forced to leave the country side to come to the city to work. you had the den population.oce we often discuss these things and how the environment, howse erosion, how the land, how the fact that we have to burn ourn i trees forn charcoal causes us have the massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goest through. so these things, too, i thinka more of the things question do something about as a community. we that -- the other theory are also -- [inaudible] talked about.t >> in reading through "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" i was struck by the fact that so manyb writers yearn in a sense to return to haiti. >> i think so many
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
. who have good home environments, right? who don't run a crazy ship at home. the kids with a crazy environment, homework hurts then. we have to make it equitable and fair for them to have the same environment to work on the crazy, familiarial problem. >> greg: what is french homework? riding a bicycle with a basket and bah quet? >> andrea: drinking red wine and smoking cigarettes. you got a-plus. >> bob: they go home and get loaded with wine. >> greg: i'm half french. bost you are? >> greg: yes. >> andrea: oh hl la. >> dana: que paso. >> greg: what does that mean? >> dana: what's up in spanish. >> greg: what does vit to do with this? you know who words from a language. >> dana: no. i know more than that. i do. i swear. feliz navidad. that is coming up, how much do they know about fe will beiz navdad? andrea hit the streets to find out. >> can you name tall santa reindeer? >> prancer. >> ♪ on this 12th day of christmas my true love gave to me 12 --" >> geese allaying. >> dana: christmas trivia directly ahead. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you like who you are... and you learned somet
smiling, playing, and learning together in a safe environment. but here is the surprise. this isn't america, it's tijuana, mexico. a tough place for a child due to drugs, violence and poverty. but the first club is helping to change lives. and this is the first boys and girls club in south africa, lives are changed here and in mexico, because the children are learning that great futures start here. the expansion of the dream is due to the vision of tupperware brand's ceo, rick and his wife susan. for more than 20 years, he's been encouraging the company to make a difference through global and social responsibility. >> i think there's really a change in the role of what-- in the social contract between individuals and their governments. a lot of governments are going broke, there's a time here where corporations need to step up and find a way, not just to fund, but to put their focus, when you put funds and focus behind it, then things start to happen. >> tupperware is proof that some big businesses are big on helping others, since 1992, tupperware has been one of the leading corpo
want to live to 100. it's their environment. the purpose of this "new york times" article and my book "the blue zones," was really to look at the environmental components that explain longevity. >> so, dan, one of the things that fascinated me in this article, this one man in his 60s, living in america, diagnosed with cancer, given nine months to live. he moves home to ikaria and he's feeling better, working in his garden. it's 30 years later, the end of the story is he comes back to talk to the u.s. to talk to his doctors to say what do you think happened to the cancer and his doctors have passed away. it's an amazing story and anecdote but what is it specifically about the lifestyle and diet there that helps treat and prevent cancer? >> well, i think it's probably the diet. it's a very clean environment. it's not only what they eat, it's how they eat. they're not eating standing up or on the run. they tend to eat with their family. it's slow. they're overlooking the aegean. i think also if you look at their terrain, there's not more than 100 yards of flatter rain, so their whole day
country's most vulnerable people that we create healthy environments and green spaces and by country men and women become fully conscious of their ability to change things for the better. >> baptist from haiti. my wish is for more justice, economic as well as social justice, starting with the recognition that poverty is not a sin. >> i wish for wish for a world without boarders and walls, age 53, argentina. [ applause ] >> i wish for a world where the children are more just and more kind and fair in the world than the one we know. president, barack obama. >> and now, this is a good one, that donna and i can very strongly identify with. i wish that male fashion designers would be forced to wear the things that they create for women like stelleto heals and it gets better. and that all politicians would have to live by the rules and laws they come up with for the rest of us like the ones on food stamps and the minimum wage by isabel, ienda >> i promise that i will not take my clothes off in public. >> i wish it would snow in the morning so nobody does not have to go to school for two weeks,
allocation. how do you generate returns and manage volatility in this kind of environment where there's so much you can't control? global head of institutional clients with jpmorgan asset management, welcome. i'm going to ask something that may be counter intuitive to a lot of people. maybe not to you. it seems to me your clients, institutions, pensions, endowments, are tax exempt. they don't have to worry quite as much it would seem to me about avoiding dividend taxes or capital gains taxes as ordinary individuals. am i right about that or wrong? >> yes and no. the point being if the fiscal cliff you look at china, eurozone, it is all coming together to create an environment of total uncertainty for a lot of the biggest investors in the world. pension funds in the u.s. are trying to manage the volatility of the funding levels, generating return. think of where the average u.s. pension fund is trying to again rate a return from 6.5% to 8%. >> it's not so much that they're concerned about a looming tax hike that might affect their portfolios as it is about the uncertainty that the cliff rep
environment, a huge life skill competitive sports in particular, extraordinary gain of american football. >> would you want for christmas? >> record by the dolphins but maybe we are off. we will see. i know i should aim higher. >> happy birthday. we are honored, we appreciate you being here. thank you for watching us. we are thankful for the partnership, thank you for coming out so early. thank you for a fantastic conversation. [applause] >> thank you for having me. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 and they are going to say that is a precedent and indiana had -- >> talking about facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i d. they did not say that all of those states would subsequently -- [talking over each other] >> let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. [talking over each other] >> the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities because it -- somehow we have something missing in our brain.
on both environment and genetics. we have established large networks to collect data and conduct powerful analyses. those networks explore possible causative factors in the environment before, during and after pregnancy. one of these networks published a study that suggests prenatal and early life exposure to car emissions is a factor. in 2012, congress appropriated over $47 million for autism and other developmental disorders. this supports 43 training programs through 41 states and projects for underserved populations. federal agencies also use public-private partnerships to maximize our, such as the nih national data office of research that has an autism depository. this brings together hundreds of researchers and clinicians with tens of thousands of people nationwide affected by asd. there is a call center, web based -- the nih supported the association in the early prevention of autism. in conclusion, since the establishment, wide expertise has come to bear on autism with research rapidly translating into individuals and the community. coordinated efforts to identify best practices t
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priority, our entire government should be repairing the infrastructure of the country. we have some infrastructure from the 19th century. with what just happened in new york, i really do think that our treasure and our people -- repairing the infrastructure will create jobs. we also have to begin protecting our coastal communities from the mega storms. even if we just decided right now to work against climate change or to slow down climate change, it still is going to happen. it will happen. it is a mechanism that is not going to stop even if we were to stop pumping co2 into the atmosphere. we have to prepare and work to tha
, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the am more at thisization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced since the de
environment. >> brenda: larry. >> brenda, the younes need to reinvent themselves. if they need to get into my skilled jobs and earn higher wages and that's the key. >> you're right and the idea of organizing the lowest end of the structure here is, as jonas says, the average lifetime of employee i think is nine mons in the fast food busins so it's antithetical and-- >> these an't coal mines and slaughter houses, brenda, these are folding sweaters at the gap, cashiers. >> we need to see more unions in china where they could make a difference, they could lift wages and improve living standards there. >> absolutely. >> and keep chinese, work forces from taking jobs away from america. >> good luck with that. >> brenda: thank you for the debate. and sandy victims facing devastation one month later, so is this any time for the united nations to be using them as a fund raising tool? the cavuto gang is all over that one at the bottom of the hour. up here first, forget fees in >> forget the pain, if we fall into the financial ditch. a new regulation in the the health care law might mauck you down rig
what you would consider a practical use of protection to the environment. >> reporter: bart says it would have cost them more if the project had been delayed or they violated wildlife protection laws. if the birds continue to pose a problem bart is going to have to continue to pay to accommodate these birds. in freemont, ann. >> talk about a wakeup call. a tree crashes through a bay area bedroom. what the ohm homeowner did just two days ago that probably saved his life. >> the grocery chain in danger of going belly up. >> and the bay area house decked out like you would not believe. it beats the world record holder. ,,,,,, at bank of america, we're continuing to lend and invest in the people, businesses, and organizations that call the bay area home. whether it's helping a nonprofit provide safe, affordable housing within the city, supporting an organization that's helping kids find jobs and stay in school, or financing the expansion of a local company that's creating healthier workplaces, what's important to the people of the bay area is important to us. and we're proud to work
humans and the environment. and a toxic ban from children's sleep wear in the 1970s. an environmental advocacy group found the tests it commissioned found high levels of tris in 16 upholstered products. but the midwesteamerican chemis counsel say that it provides time -- a furniture trade group says it's not aware of any evidence including in the sofa study linking the retard ands in furniture as a home health problem. additional research is needed for the sole purpose of meeting california's strict standards. the treadway's say for them, finding this ecofriendly douch was worth it. >>> we're back in a moment with a santa sighting tonight, half a world away. has gotta be just ri. perfect golden color. rich in fiber. my dad taught me, and i taught my son out there. morning, pa. wait... who's driving the...? ♪ 99 bushels of wheat on the farm, 99 bushels of wheat ♪ [ male announcer ] yep, there's 8 layers of whole grain fiber in those mini-wheats® biscuits... to help keep you full... ♪ 45 bushels of wheat ...all morning long. there's a big breakfast... [ mini ] yee haw! ...in thos
environment, once google has seen that new rocketship, i see no reason why google should be any different. especially since google owns android. they need to figure out how to monetize it better. something the company is doing by releasing its own line of smartphones and tablets. google is sold out until after christmas. of the growth stocks, i got to admit i like google less than i did before the bad quarter if you're trying to figure out which of these stocks worries me the most, it's google, it's become a show-me situation. how about visa and master cad? both up decently since i recommended them in october. these are both plays in the worldwide switch from paper currency to plastic. visa and mastercard both reported strong quarters in october, they have healthy balance sheets. mastercard is winning new business all over the place. and visa announced a $1 billion buyback. even though visa has a new ceo, i'm a big fan of both stocks. i think they're both candidates to offer special dividends as the year unwinds. they've got the cash for certain. then there's the sherwin williams. the sto
, that's a target-rich environment is what we refer to california. they raise taxes again. they sent the message that the unions are going to continue to control the process out there. they defeated proposition 32. they passed proposition 30 which was the increase in their taxes. so, california businessmen and women are looking at their bottom line saying, where are we going to go? other places? >> governor, is it too much of a leap to say when we do this at the federal level they leave the country, bilss can eventually leave the country. >> sure. >> but we can't seem to make the leap to say that. and i'm talking about the fiscal cliff now. i wonder if you were at 25% of gdp, if the government had grown to this size where it is right now and you were trying to figure out how to deal with it and you were in charge, would it be all about -- would the first thing you come up with be raising taxes? would not -- wouldn't you address the spending -- wouldn't you address the spending side of -- >> right. >> -- and, you know, the republicans are trying to criticize the obama proposals by say
the great animal orchestra about the sounds animals make in the environment, and he broke it down and said, look, in an environment that remains stable, insects take this frequency bandwidth and the mammals are kind of here, and the monkeys or whatever are here, the birds are in here. they have it worked out and as if it is lines of music and all playing their parts and they don't intrude on the others. >> rose: yes. >> and it was kind of a huge insight and i thought that is absolutely right. yeah. >> rose: tell me about the role of brian eno. >> he is -- he was instrumental in kind of pushing talking heads as a band. >> rose: right. >> beyond what we were used to doing. and then he and i worked together as collaborators, as collaborators before. he is not entirely but to some extent he is a nonmusician, he actually can play an instrument but he prefers to think of himself as a nonmusician so he prefers to work and think of how the music is organized as opposed to sitting and jamming with somebody. >> you are now collaborating with annie clark. >> yes. >> rose: how is that going? >> it has
what the environment means in haiti. >> the environment means a lot. haiti is a country that has been hit by seasonal climate events almost every year. weather events and hurricanes have severely affected the country. every year, thousands of people are dying. many have been displaced. many others are still homeless. as a youth, it is my responsibility to take part in these activities, to do something about it. i would like to see climate justice. >> what the climate justice mean to you? >> for me, eradication of poverty. that means developed countries need to take responsibility by fulfilling -- by providing finance, which is key for countries like haiti. >> marco, what the climate justice mean to you? >> all of that, including the fact that currently, emissions in the atmosphere, 75% are coming from developed countries , countries that have done everything for over a century and now they're trying to place the burden on developed countries -- developing countries who barely have enough to eat. we have a severe injustice here that we need to act on. climate justice, in a nutshell, me
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
then baked circe wells while also enhancing the environment. although the project on our coast of their job, they were weakened or in the storm not require repairs so were not for mobility future storms. unfortunately the northeast mid-atlantic received more frequent and larger storms like standing in the future. the 70 to find cost-effective ways to ensure projects will continue to protect lives and property. we also need to look into whether adaptive measures. wetlands, oyster beds and sea grass that are cost and can be sustained for years to come. but can also get better results for less money if we allow states more flexibility in managing different sources along the shoreline is a complete set of the system instead as an individual project. this strategy is called regional government man to rent this one that deserves more attention. madam chair and colleagues, i think you've concluded your draft of water resources bill in which i appreciate and i hope we can address that later this year. unfortunately, other areas where this will protect it and saw. this first photo -- this is a new b
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
and be informed in an entertaining, fun environment, in a safe environment, where they can take that, what they have learned from the show and have conversations. >> it is also a tough environment. i e-mailed you before i went to see it. i said, i have a daughter that's almost 11. do you think you should bring her? >> i thought, i'm not sure. when i thought it, i saw exactly, i'm not sure. some of what happens to girls in the world is pretty ugly. >> i think girls 12 and over should see the play. i was just doing the 1 billion rising tour that we will talk about. i was in mexico city. i was with one of the women there that is fighting sex trafficking and human trafficking which $6 billion a year industry. we were just walking down the streets. there were girls, 9, 10, 11, 12, who had been sold, who had been kidnapped, raped 60 times a day. the kind of lives of women, girls across the planet is so varied. it is all part of the same story, girls not having agency over their bodies. >> on the one hand, you have monologues, often global girls telling about horrific conditions like that sexual
look at jobs report tomorrow, is dismal. we're liking inflationary environment down the road. this is bad news. >> you could could make the argument invite blowing past short term helpful, long term payne full. melissa: spending cuts, tax hikes are very dramatic going over the cliff. when you look at numbers, still is like five to one raising taxes to cutting spending. >> that's right. melissa: no one is really talking about cutting spending. isn't that the first thing you would do? if your fiscal house was in such disarray, household at home, first thing you do is stop spending. no one is doing that. >> what scares me, is that point. whether you agree or disagree hiking taxes i am not a fan of it but i think it will come. we can get past this. charlie gasparino and i have argued this. one of the consequences of the election the president will probably get his way raising most rates. melissa: right. >> i'm not saying i'm a fan. let's get past that, let's make it happen. republicans realize you lost election you didn't suddenly lose your backbone. this should be precursor gett
on the table could you imagine that breaking through the current political environment. >> i think basically now, gwen, there are three sticking points. one is the amount of revenue and the sources of revenue. the second is the amount of spending cuts and how much of that will come from the entitlement programs particularly health. the last sticking point is what do we do about this debt limit that we've come up against all the time that puts our credit in danger. >> ifill: the president has said the debt limit should be, at least in his opening statement, that the debt limit debate should be set aside and that nothing can be done unless the taxes are cut... are raised for the wealthy. is that part of a solution that you can see working for what it is everybody is trying to get to here? >> look, gwen, i'm not a bit worried that it appears on the surface that secretary geithner ton the speaker didn't make any progress last week. that's just a theater you go through. geithner made his first offer. the republicans rejected it. no surprise. i'm sure that this offer that the speaker has made toda
people are. we're in a greatly diminished yield environment. people scramble for what they can. if you think yields are low know, a lot of investors think they could even go lower. it's unbelievable how low the yields are in the fixed income markets, but again, i think you're going to see compression with those types of stocks. i think what you're really going to see is dividend policies revisited contrary to the fact that from a tax point of view, folks are going to be basically less likely to buy dividend stocks because investors want income, and that's the only place they can get it. >> michael, we get a handf fufu companies every day declaring dividends. they're accelerating the payment to try to beat out the fiscal cliff. would you invest looking for companies like that right now? >> i think you're seeing the top of the dividend trade. i think if anything, what's going to end up happening is a focus back into cyclical sectors for 2013. you want the global trade. you don't want the domestic trade anymore. >> you're not going to be jumping on the bandwagon here just because companie
's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and that mold has been called into question, not least by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there are others who find they can't hit their stride with the asset they say accummed a decade ago. >> ifill: what we're watching happening at citigroup. does that make them an outlier or a sign of things to come? >> i think
because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive
to stormwater infrastructure to transport water away from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the water
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 185 (some duplicates have been removed)